On Letitia Vansant

I love for music to surprise me. It’s quite a rarity these days, when so much of what we hear on the radio is highly formulaic and over-produced. So it is a treat of the best order when you come across a true original, an artist whose refreshingly unfamiliar sound defies genre-classification and comparisons to similar artists. Although I wasn’t initially smitten with the first Letitia Vansant song I heard called “Macy’s Parking Lot,” I was hooked not even halfway through my first listen to her album.

Once again, I’ve got to hand it to local Baltimore radio station WTMD – true to their word, they helped me discover an incredible artist that I cannot imagine having discovered by any other means. Letitia Vansant’s album “Breakfast Truce” was featured on the independent station as their January Album of the Month, offering the Baltimore-based singer-songerwriter plenty of much deserved airplay all month long and beyond. Though “Macy’s Parking Lot” was her most popular cut on WTMD’s playlist, it wasn’t until I caught the tail end of “Brother Left the Mine” that I decided to listen to the entirety of this album my favorite radio station couldn’t stop plugging.

Following the Macy’s song, Vansant’s album opens with the plainly beautiful “Brother Left the Mine,” a track whose simplicity showcases Vansant’s abilities as a songwriter. Though the ensuing tracks have a cohesive flow, Vansant’s debut release demonstrates her wide range in both style and sound. “As I Was Told” rings with innocence and a poppy lightness, only to be followed by the darker haunting tune “The Bits and the Pieces.” A few tracks later, the folk-meets-country “Crick in My Neck” highlights the raspier side of Vansant’s vocals over a strings-driven tune. “The Notion” has an intriguingly French feel to it, plucky and sophisticatedly flirtatious. It’s remarkable that a song with so much personality features just Vansant’s lone guitar and vocals for its entire duration. And then the full musicality of “Man Enough” shortly follows, with its vaguely 90’s melody and more nuanced instrumentation. “Breakfast Truce” ends strong with the title song, a mournful track that draws on the soulfulness of Vansant’s voice. The cut sounds like a live lo-fi recording – I can’t help but picture Vansant belting it out from atop a stool on an otherwise bare stage in some dark basement bar.

Much as I have grown to adore the entirety of Vansant’s diverse album, my favorite number is undoubtedly “Parajita,” one of the most interesting tracks I’ve heard in far too long. Unlike many songs nowadays where you can sense what notes, sometimes even what lyrics, are coming next, this tune kept me on my toes, continually surprised by the instruments, sounds, and chord changes introduced. My first listen was a totally refreshing and addicting experience, and it has become the one song I jump to each and every time I power up Spotify.

With Letitia Vansant’s “Breakfast Truce,” I’ve discovered a brilliant female artist with a bright future, a catalogue of new songs to relish, one for nearly any mood in which I might find myself. Vansant’s raw talent is undeniable and, paired with her master  songwriting skills, allows Vansant to hone in on many of a wide range of emotions with remarkable musical precision.

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2 thoughts on “On Letitia Vansant

  1. Pingback: On The Shouting Matches | Remember When The Music

  2. Pingback: On My Hiatus | Remember When The Music

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